Book Fight

This week we're reading the first novel in C.S. Lewis's beloved Narnia series, which Mike loved as a child and somehow Tom missed out on entirely. Will the book hold up to the scrutiny of two skeptical, sometimes cynical adults? Will the Christian elements feel too heavy handed? Or will Mike and Tom find themselves filled with earnest, childlike wonder? Only one way to find out!

For more visit us online at bookfightpod.com

Direct download: Ep120_CSLewis_LionWitchWardrobe.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

It's the last week for our Winter of Wayback episodes this year, and we're investigating 1975. We've got a Harry Crews essay from Playboy about a day spent with some local grits in Johnson City, Tennessee. Plus the beginnings of the men's rights movement, Philadelphia's mayor giving the press the silent treatment, and the inventor of the Pet Rock. 

For more, visit us online at bookfightpod.com. 

And if you're going to be AWP, come by the Barrelhouse table and say hello!

Direct download: Ep119_Wayback_1975.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

This week's book is actually two New Yorker profiles of a famous bohemian, writer, poet and all-around Greenwich Village eccentric. Mitchell first wrote about Gould in 1942, then wrote a much longer follow-up in the early 60's about his further dealings with Gould and his growing suspicion that the long book Gould had been working on for years didn't, in fact, exist.

We debate the ethical dimensions of the writer-subject relationship, and whether Mitchell was fair in his treatment of Gould, who clearly suffered from mental illness. We've also got an installment of South Philly News, about an aggrieved parent in a hipster coffee shop. 

For more, visit us online at bookfightpod.com

Direct download: Ep118_Mitchell_JoeGould.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

We've zoomed back in time to 1935, a year in which Philly politics got ugly, and monkeys ran wild on the streets of New York City. It was also the "golden age of detective fiction," so we read two stories by John Dickson Carr, considered a master of the form, particularly what's known as "locked room mysteries." 

For more, check us out online at bookfightpod.com

Direct download: Ep117_Wayback_1935.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EST

1